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Why I Choose to Shop Vintage?





Yes, I love pretty pictures and I love pretty clothes. Yes, I use them to get your attention to convey a narrative around the environmental crisis and the impact fashion is having on that. Yes, I have every intention to use my influence to change this industry for good. I am 100% transparent about why I do what I do.










A huge reason why I continue to contribute to my blog today, though letting go of using this blog as a business, is to share from my heart, creative expression, and to do my advocacy work to make a positive difference in the world. Most of the clothes I share on this platform are secondhand- not the best business model, no question.



No affiliate kick-backs coming in on thrift store or vintage estate sale finds, unfortunately for me. But- I must continue to stand behind what I believe in most. And to this day, I believe that secondhand clothing is the very most sustainable shopping you can do, if you must shop.




Why Choose Vintage?



Other than the fact that it's the best shopping you can do for the planet, environmentally speaking, I love that you will always find something unique– like a one-off, one of a kind piece that no one else will have. It’s that sense of individuality that I value- and that is what I choose to fill my closet with today.



Learning to get more creative with the wardrobe you already have makes your closet a more sustainable one; it will reduce unnecessary purchases, reduce waste and conserve resources- ultimately the making of a happier healthier planet.




A few more reasons why I shop vintage & secondhand?


  • 13 million tons of textiles are sent to landfills in the US alone every year

  • 100 pairs of human hands touch our clothes before we see it in stores or online

  • 2720 liters of water used to make one conventional cotton T shirt

  • 2900 gallons of water used to make one conventional cotton pair of jeans

(above stats Remake)






One thing we all can do is to consider the environment when we shop for clothing




"Fashion you can buy, but style you possess. The key to style is learning who you are, which takes years. There's no how-to road map to style. It's about self expression and, above all, attitude." —Iris Apfel




Another sustainable fashion practice comes down to simply knowing your style. When we are clear and are aware of what our true style is, we are more likely to only buy those things. The things we know we will wear and love and probably take great care of and keep for a really long time. This is what sustainable shopping and conscious consumption comes down to.



Of course, I stand behind my above statement: If you can find something secondhand, my biggest recommendation is to shop secondhand. You can find current styles, designers and even brand new clothes with the tags still on.










According to the United Nations Environment Program: “The fashion industry produces 20% of global wastewater and 10% of global carbon emissions. This is more than all international flights and maritime shipping combined.”



This year is the 50th Anniversary Earth Day celebration,

April 22nd.

My hope in sharing this is that you recognize that the planet is at a very vulnerable state right now, and yes, sadly, the fashion industry may have a lot to do with that truth. But we, as consumers, do too. I share that point because I want you to feel empowered and inspired to take things into your own hands. If we, as consumers, are part of the problem, we are also the solution.







Whoever you are– we need everyone to start raising their voices and using their influence to create positive change for our planet.



What’s one more thing you can start doing or sharing with your network to raise awareness of our planet’s fragile state? If you need tips or ideas, please don’t hesitate to reach out to me. I am here to help.






Outfit shown 100% USED, vintage from Goodwill  



Photography by Carrilee Fox